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sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

(via dontbearuiner)

Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol
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"

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

"

- Libby Anne (via coachk13)

(via damnhistrionics)

Source: dumbledoresarmy-againstbigotry
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-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

(via acafanmom)

Source: -teesa-
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historicalagentcarter:

In the wake of the revelation in The Winter Soldier that Peggy had married one of the soldiers of the 107th freed by Steve, I’ve seen some speculation that she may have been referring to Gabe Jones, with whom Peggy was tied romantically in comics canon. So, though some of it may seem obvious, I thought I’d comment on some of the tremendous obstacles that Peggy and Gabe would have had to overcome in mid-century America.

Read More

(via potofsoup)

Source: historicalagentcarter
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killerville:

apocalypsecanceled:

zuky:

zuky:

This is Wong Chin Foo. His name is now forgotten to the US mainstream, but his recorded legacy of brash, outspoken, irreverant pro-Chinese activism, in an era of unbridled anti-Chinese racism, stands as a monument of resistance. He was a 19th-century agitator who is believed to have coined the phrase “Chinese American” when he boldly emblazened those words across the banner of New York’s first Chinese newspaper which he founded in 1883.
Born in China in 1851, Wong Chin Foo came to the US in 1864 to study English. Because he arrived as a minor and lived in the US for more than 5 years, he was able to obtain naturalization papers in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1874, becoming one of the first people of Chinese descent to become a US citizen. He traveled across the US giving lectures on Chinese civilization, in which he proudly declared himself a heathen and suggested that Westerners should learn about religion themselves before sending missionaries to China. He called Jesus a “Johnny Come Lately” in contrast to the more ancient teachings of Confucius. He said, “I never knew that rats and puppies were good to eat until I was told by American people.”
Wong repeatedly showed up to heckle speeches by the anti-Chinese organizer Dennis Kearney, whose slogan “The Chinese must go!” was used to incite lynch mobs. Wong went so far as to challenge Kearney to a duel, offering to give the Irishman the choice of weapons: chopsticks, potatoes, or pistols. Kearney declined.
In 1893, Wong appeared before a US House Committee hearing to urge Congress to repeal the Chinese Exclusion Act (to no avail). He founded the Chinese Equal Rights League to demand the right to vote and to organize against Chinese Exclusion. Wong encouraged his fellow Chinese to refuse to carry the apartheid-like IDs which were required of them. In 1894, he organized a civil disobedience action in front of the Federal Building in Manhattan, resulting in the arrest of League member Fong Yue Ting. Like many other legal challenges to Chinese Exclusion, the case made it all the way to the Supreme Court, where Chinese Exclusion was upheld.
In the early 20th century, Wong supported the revolution in China and the overthrow of the Qing dynasty led by Sun Yat-Sen. After that, there is no more record of him. He disappeared, and nobody knows what became of him.

killerville:

apocalypsecanceled:

zuky:

zuky:

This is Wong Chin Foo. His name is now forgotten to the US mainstream, but his recorded legacy of brash, outspoken, irreverant pro-Chinese activism, in an era of unbridled anti-Chinese racism, stands as a monument of resistance. He was a 19th-century agitator who is believed to have coined the phrase “Chinese American” when he boldly emblazened those words across the banner of New York’s first Chinese newspaper which he founded in 1883.

Born in China in 1851, Wong Chin Foo came to the US in 1864 to study English. Because he arrived as a minor and lived in the US for more than 5 years, he was able to obtain naturalization papers in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1874, becoming one of the first people of Chinese descent to become a US citizen. He traveled across the US giving lectures on Chinese civilization, in which he proudly declared himself a heathen and suggested that Westerners should learn about religion themselves before sending missionaries to China. He called Jesus a “Johnny Come Lately” in contrast to the more ancient teachings of Confucius. He said, “I never knew that rats and puppies were good to eat until I was told by American people.”

Wong repeatedly showed up to heckle speeches by the anti-Chinese organizer Dennis Kearney, whose slogan “The Chinese must go!” was used to incite lynch mobs. Wong went so far as to challenge Kearney to a duel, offering to give the Irishman the choice of weapons: chopsticks, potatoes, or pistols. Kearney declined.

In 1893, Wong appeared before a US House Committee hearing to urge Congress to repeal the Chinese Exclusion Act (to no avail). He founded the Chinese Equal Rights League to demand the right to vote and to organize against Chinese Exclusion. Wong encouraged his fellow Chinese to refuse to carry the apartheid-like IDs which were required of them. In 1894, he organized a civil disobedience action in front of the Federal Building in Manhattan, resulting in the arrest of League member Fong Yue Ting. Like many other legal challenges to Chinese Exclusion, the case made it all the way to the Supreme Court, where Chinese Exclusion was upheld.

In the early 20th century, Wong supported the revolution in China and the overthrow of the Qing dynasty led by Sun Yat-Sen. After that, there is no more record of him. He disappeared, and nobody knows what became of him.

Source: zuky
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ktothestein:

and so it goes…  (went)

(via tennyowithaluger)

Source: sandandglass
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Near Miss: The Solar Superstorm of July 2012 - NASA Science

SPONTANEOUSLY COMBUSTING TELEGRAPH OFFICES, you guys.

Source: dduane
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amnhnyc:

On July 20, 1969, with 600 million people watching on TV, an American crew landed on the Moon—the first people ever to walk on another world. The Apollo 11 mission had three crew members: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, who piloted the craft that would return them to Earth, while the others became the first two men ever to walk its surface.

Learn more about this historic event

(via theletteraesc)

Source: amnhnyc
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"Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”"

-

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

This makes me laugh every time I see it.

(via tamorapierce)

(via damnhistrionics)

Source: bibliothekara
Quote

"Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”"

- The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

(via fieldbears)

Source: bibliothekara
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white-history-month:

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

Afong Moy.  Her name was Afong Moy.  Say the names of people who should be remembered.

(via teland)

Source: watermillions
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"But it turned out that Joan was really, uncannily good at leading an army. She had skills that no female person who’d spent her life tending house — the thing she was best at, she later told a room full of men, was sewing — had any reason to possess. “She was quite innocent, unless it be in warfare,” says the former roommate. “She rode on horseback and handled the lance like the best of the knights, and the soldiers marveled.” Uh, yeah: I’ll bet they did.

So it turned out she was good, and you all know this part of the story. She was very good at it, despite the fact that she was initially excluded from the important meetings, and despite the fact that she had no training, and despite the fact that she was a woman and people weren’t supposed to listen to those — “harlot,” was a common theory among the English at the time, because what would a woman be doing in the army unless was sleeping with all of the soldiers; one English soldier straight-up laughed at the idea of “surrendering to a woman” — and despite the fact that her whole authority was based on telling people that she had magic powers. She took an arrow in the neck, in the middle of a battle, and kept fighting. If you want to get a sense of what actually made it possible for her to get from a kitchen in the middle of nowhere, to standing in front of the King and making her case, to a leadership position in the military, to leading this one particular hopeless lost cause of a battle, the Siege of Orleans, and winning it, this is instructive. If you want to get a sense of the sheer willpower driving this woman, think about being just a little female teenager from nowhere with no military training, whose biggest talent was sewing, shoved into chaotic, close-range, hugely violent battle, and about what it would take for you not to freak the fuck out at this point, what it would take to keep fighting with an arrow in your neck."

- Running Towards The Gunshots: A Few Words About Joan of Arc (via gatheringbones)

(via lettersfromtitan)

Source: tigerbeatdown.com
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Old Penn Station, ca. 1905-1910. It was tragically demolished in 1963.

(via ohthatsloverly)

Source: theboweryboys.blogspot.com
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socimages:

The military camels of the north American west.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

Dr. Grumpy re-tells the fascinating story of the importation of camels to North America for use as beasts of burden.  He begins:

Following the Mexican-American war, the United States found itself in control of a large desert… The U.S. Army needed to establish bases and supply lines in the area, both for the border with Mexico and the continuing wars with Indian tribes.

The railroad system was in it’s infancy, and there were no tracks through the area… The only way across was to use horses. But horses, like humans, are heavily dependent on water. This made the area difficult to cross, and vulnerable to attacking Apaches.

And so in 1855 Jefferson Davis… put into action an idea proposed by several officers: buy camels to serve in the desert. 

The next year they imported somewhere between 62 and 73 camels and, with them, 8 camel drivers all led by a man named Hadji Ali. Enter the U.S. Army Camel Corps.

Camels at an Army Fort (source):

Illustration of camels in camp (source):

Camels on the go (1850s) (source):

Says Dr. Grumpy:

They led supply trains all over, from Texas to California…

But there were problems. The Americans had envisioned combined forces of camels and horses, each making up for the deficiencies of the other. But horses and donkeys are frightened of camels, making joint convoys difficult and requiring separate corrals. The army was also unprepared for their intrinsically difficult personalities- camels bite, spit, kick, and are short-tempered. Horses are comparatively easy to handle.

Then came the start of the American Civil War, which focused military attention to the east. With troops pulled out of the American desert, and horses better suited to the eastern terrain, the camels were abandoned.  Though Weird CA suggests that they were used in the war, Dr. Grumpy reports that most simply escaped into the desert.  For a time, there was a wild camel population in the U.S.

Meanwhile, a former-solider and Canadian gold prospector, Frank Laumeister, figured that camels would be great pack animals for his new line of work. He bought a herd in 1862, but they didn’t work out so well in the rockier terrain. Plus:

The Canadians, like the Americans, discovered they weren’t easy to handle. The same problems of difficult disposition and spooking horses came up. In addition, they found camels would eat anything they found. Hats. Shoes. Clothes that were out drying. Even soap. And so, after a few years, the Canadians gave up on the experiment, too.

Our original head camel driver, Hadji Ali, eventually got out of the camel business, but he never left America. He became a citizen in 1880, married a woman named Gertrudis Serna and had two children. He died in Arizona in 1902, having spent 51 years of his life in the U.S. You’ll find his tombstone in Quartzsite, Arizona labeled with the name “Hi Jolly,” the Americanized pronunciation of his full name (source).

The last sighting of a wild camel in North America was in 1941 near Douglas, Texas (source).

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

(via cimness)

Source: socimages
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weirdvintage:

Alfred Hitchcock eating a pretzel at the premiere of Psycho, 1960 (via This is Not Porn)

Source: thisisnotporn.net