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white-history-month:

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

Afong Moy.  Her name was Afong Moy.  Say the names of people who should be remembered.

(via teland)

Source: elizajumel
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"But it turned out that Joan was really, uncannily good at leading an army. She had skills that no female person who’d spent her life tending house — the thing she was best at, she later told a room full of men, was sewing — had any reason to possess. “She was quite innocent, unless it be in warfare,” says the former roommate. “She rode on horseback and handled the lance like the best of the knights, and the soldiers marveled.” Uh, yeah: I’ll bet they did.

So it turned out she was good, and you all know this part of the story. She was very good at it, despite the fact that she was initially excluded from the important meetings, and despite the fact that she had no training, and despite the fact that she was a woman and people weren’t supposed to listen to those — “harlot,” was a common theory among the English at the time, because what would a woman be doing in the army unless was sleeping with all of the soldiers; one English soldier straight-up laughed at the idea of “surrendering to a woman” — and despite the fact that her whole authority was based on telling people that she had magic powers. She took an arrow in the neck, in the middle of a battle, and kept fighting. If you want to get a sense of what actually made it possible for her to get from a kitchen in the middle of nowhere, to standing in front of the King and making her case, to a leadership position in the military, to leading this one particular hopeless lost cause of a battle, the Siege of Orleans, and winning it, this is instructive. If you want to get a sense of the sheer willpower driving this woman, think about being just a little female teenager from nowhere with no military training, whose biggest talent was sewing, shoved into chaotic, close-range, hugely violent battle, and about what it would take for you not to freak the fuck out at this point, what it would take to keep fighting with an arrow in your neck."

- Running Towards The Gunshots: A Few Words About Joan of Arc (via gatheringbones)

(via lettersfromtitan)

Source: tigerbeatdown.com
Photo Set

Old Penn Station, ca. 1905-1910. It was tragically demolished in 1963.

(via ohthatsloverly)

Source: theboweryboys.blogspot.com
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socimages:

The military camels of the north American west.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

Dr. Grumpy re-tells the fascinating story of the importation of camels to North America for use as beasts of burden.  He begins:

Following the Mexican-American war, the United States found itself in control of a large desert… The U.S. Army needed to establish bases and supply lines in the area, both for the border with Mexico and the continuing wars with Indian tribes.

The railroad system was in it’s infancy, and there were no tracks through the area… The only way across was to use horses. But horses, like humans, are heavily dependent on water. This made the area difficult to cross, and vulnerable to attacking Apaches.

And so in 1855 Jefferson Davis… put into action an idea proposed by several officers: buy camels to serve in the desert. 

The next year they imported somewhere between 62 and 73 camels and, with them, 8 camel drivers all led by a man named Hadji Ali. Enter the U.S. Army Camel Corps.

Camels at an Army Fort (source):

Illustration of camels in camp (source):

Camels on the go (1850s) (source):

Says Dr. Grumpy:

They led supply trains all over, from Texas to California…

But there were problems. The Americans had envisioned combined forces of camels and horses, each making up for the deficiencies of the other. But horses and donkeys are frightened of camels, making joint convoys difficult and requiring separate corrals. The army was also unprepared for their intrinsically difficult personalities- camels bite, spit, kick, and are short-tempered. Horses are comparatively easy to handle.

Then came the start of the American Civil War, which focused military attention to the east. With troops pulled out of the American desert, and horses better suited to the eastern terrain, the camels were abandoned.  Though Weird CA suggests that they were used in the war, Dr. Grumpy reports that most simply escaped into the desert.  For a time, there was a wild camel population in the U.S.

Meanwhile, a former-solider and Canadian gold prospector, Frank Laumeister, figured that camels would be great pack animals for his new line of work. He bought a herd in 1862, but they didn’t work out so well in the rockier terrain. Plus:

The Canadians, like the Americans, discovered they weren’t easy to handle. The same problems of difficult disposition and spooking horses came up. In addition, they found camels would eat anything they found. Hats. Shoes. Clothes that were out drying. Even soap. And so, after a few years, the Canadians gave up on the experiment, too.

Our original head camel driver, Hadji Ali, eventually got out of the camel business, but he never left America. He became a citizen in 1880, married a woman named Gertrudis Serna and had two children. He died in Arizona in 1902, having spent 51 years of his life in the U.S. You’ll find his tombstone in Quartzsite, Arizona labeled with the name “Hi Jolly,” the Americanized pronunciation of his full name (source).

The last sighting of a wild camel in North America was in 1941 near Douglas, Texas (source).

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

(via cimness)

Source: socimages
Photo

weirdvintage:

Alfred Hitchcock eating a pretzel at the premiere of Psycho, 1960 (via This is Not Porn)

Source: thisisnotporn.net
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bisexual-books:

desidere:

feminismandflowers:

desidere:

feminismandflowers:

being femme is not about being feminine. it’s about reclaiming what it is to be strong.

people read as feminine have also been condemned as weak, frail, unauthentic, and incapable as long as time is old. being femme, no matter gender identity, is about saying, fuck you, the things that make me feminine also make me strong. my femininity is not fake, contrived, or narrow - it is real and broad and open and empowering.

femme is a lesbian term just fyi (meaning femme lesbian)

i mean i agree but you tagged this with bi tumblr and it’s not an inclusive term it is lesbian exclusive (as is butch, dyke).  

nope. sorry, but you are 100% wrong.

bi women have ALWAYS been a part of queer women’s movements and always will be. we have always been a part of forming “lesbian” culture and always will be. and we will always reserve the right to reclaim words like femme, butch, and dyke, because these are also descriptors of our lives and our experiences of queerness.

i am a queer, bisexual femme dyke and no amount of sapphobic, bisexual erasing identity policing can make me otherwise.

no one’s saying bi women aren’t queer women

but we are 100% saying the terms butch and femme (and dyke) arose from the LESBIAN community for LESBIANS exclusively about the LESBIAN experience 

u don’t get to rewrite history and appropriate a lesbian term and then call it bisexual erasure ????

Butch and femme emerged in the early twentieth century as a set of sexual and emotional identities among lesbians. To give a general but oversimplified idea of what butch-femme entails, one might say that butches exhibit traditionally “masculine” traits while femmes embody “feminine” ones. Although oral histories have demonstrated that butch-femme couples were seen in America as far back as the turn of the twentieth century, and that they were particularly conspicuous in the 1930s, it is the mid-century working-class and bar culture that most clearly illustrate the archetypal butch-femme dynamic. - GLBTQ

do do do

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source

The contemporary feminist analysis of lesbian identity is an example of just such a tendency. For the past two decades, the dominant form of feminist discourse has, in attempting to “liberate” lesbian identity from patriarchal control, instead imposed its own identity politics on the lesbian community, with the result that those lesbians whose behaviors or “styles” do not conform to the feminist agenda have been doubly-oppressed — once by the dominant patriarchal culture, and again by the movement that claimed to seek the liberation of all women. This is perhaps most obvious in the feminist critique of role playing among lesbians, which is considered by the dominant feminist discourse to be a barrier to one’s “true” identity as a woman (assuming that there is such a thing).

Despite the power and influence of this discourse, however, voices have risen from within a sort of “counter” lesbian-feminist community of scholars who wish to challenge the limiting identity politics of the seventies and early eighties. Before moving into a review of the way these voices address the identity issues surrounding lesbian butch-femme role-playing, however, it would be useful to consider some of the more general attempts at understanding the politics of lesbian identity which have both influenced and been influenced by this more specific issue. source

Lesbian Identity and the Politcs of Butch-Femme Roles, Part 2

Because they have rejected sex roles, second-wave lesbian feminists perceive butch/femme roles to be oppressive imitations of heterosexuality.[4] Lesbian feminists of the 1970s and 1980s link butches’ masculine gender expression to patriarchal power and femmes’ feminine presentation to artificiality and frivolity. Such feminists dismiss butch/femme roles as anachronistic, even when the individuals in question report feeling empowered and satisfied with their masculine and/or feminine gender presentations.[5] Defining butches as male-identified imposters and femmes as subordinate throwbacks imposes a singular standard of (white) lesbian authenticity, ignores the rich history of butch/femme resistance, and disregards the ways in which butch and femme women successfully create alternative gender identities that subvert the dominant sex/gender system. Assuming androgyny to be a more radical and empowering gender expression in all cases fails to recognize the multi-faceted identities of femmes of colour, whose specific position within queer and feminist communities invites a racial analysis that exposes issues of authenticity. Far from being passive victims of butch supremacy, femme women of colour challenge, empower, and transform femininity. Whereas heterosexual femininity is associated with artificiality and passivity, femme identity is a unique gender expression that enables self-acceptance and resistance to white, heterosexist, and patriarchal control.

[…] Often, other queers only recognize femmes as lesbians when they are accompanied by a butch partner.[18] Despite femmes of colours’ radical gender expression, queer and feminist communities often value a white, androgynous/masculine aesthetic that does not recognize the multi-faceted and intersecting aspects of femmes’ identities. source

and

Interviews were conducted with femme-identified lesbians; the focus was upon 4 content areas: identity development, experiences in the lesbian community, heterosexual society, and romantic relationships. 

The Misunderstood Gender: A Model of Modern Femme Identity Butch–Femme History

and

Kurland was a lesbian, but from 1953 to 1970 she was in the closet and married to a man. So calling the bars was her only connection to the gay and lesbian community, said Marie Cartier, who interviewed Kurland and is author of “Baby, You Are My Religion,” a book that examines how gay bars from the 1940s to the mid 1970s were sanctuaries for butch-femme lesbians. [source]

and wow

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"demonstrating that butch/femme roles were a critical part of lesbian history and sexuality”

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Reader’s Guide to Lesbian and Gay Studies

 edited by Timothy Murphy [source]

it is almost like it is an explicit fact that butch and femme lesbian identities are lesbian identities which derived from the lesbian community

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and claiming otherwise would be erasing…..lesbians…..

Oh my god.  This is so…. painfully bad.   

Just a tip for any blogger out there:  When someone from their community tells you that there is a problem with your community downplaying, ignoring, or erasing their contributions to history, YOU DO NOT GO GET ALL YOUR SOURCES FROM THE COMMUNITY THAT DID THE ERASING TO PROVE THEM WRONG.

All this post proves is that lesbians are REALLY good at erasing the contributions of bisexual people in our shared queer women’s history.

I’m not even going to touch the first bit of “proof” from glbt.org since they don’t use any sources for their articles.   But all the rest of these sources about butch/femme are from lesbians aka “the people doing the erasing”.   Of course they are not going to give you accurate perspectives on bisexual contributions in history!   

It’s like when you have a relative who watches nothing but Fox News and you try to talk to them about something that is happening that Fox News ignores or only covers in their skewed way and they keep insisting they are informed because they watch a lot of Fox News.   *facepalm*

So let’s lay down some real knowledge about the history of butch/femme and hell, I’ll even throw in a bit about dyke even though that’s not what this post is about.   It gives me a chance to brush the dust off my Bachelor’s degree (History and Women’s Studies major with a minor in LGBT Studies). 

The word femme was first used by cross-dressing lesbian Anne Lister to refer to her bisexual lover Marianna Lawton.  The word femme has always been for bisexual women because it was first directed towards us.   We share it with lesbians because in Lister and Lawton’s time there was not such a clear-cut distinction between lesbians and bisexuals.  There was only one group - what is often referred to as Same Gender Loving People.  Lesbian, bisexual, and even gay were not separate islands in the queer sea like they are now.  Think more like queer Pangea.  

At that time, lesbians were not what we think of now — namely that identifying as a lesbian did not preclude sleeping with and having relationships with men.  Bisexual was not a commonly used term at the time.  It’s use was mostly limited to academia given that it had come from botany though it started to gain ground in psychology circles after 1900.   Other terms for queer women like invert, sapphic, homophile, and tribades were thrown around just as easily as lesbian.  However lesbian was the one that eventually took off.  

But there is a danger of getting too excited about particular words in history — words change their meaning.  

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The word lesbian itself was originally used as a synonym for tribade or tribadeism, referring to women stimulating other women sexually by scissoring.  Lesbianism was something one DID not something one WAS.  You could be a lesbian when you were with a girl and straight when you were with a boy — all in the same evening if you liked!   Clearly this not how we use the word lesbian in modern times.

Butch came to us much later then femme, in the 1940’s.   There were lesbian non-monosexuals in all lesbian communities of the 1940’s when butch was easily paired to femme and took off as identity labels.   At that time you could call yourself a butch lesbian and be non-monosexual (ie what we now recognize as bisexual).  Again, the word bisexual had not yet come into common use outside of academia so there was no easy way to distinguish between a woman that had relationships with women exclusively and a woman that had relationships with men and women.  

Sidenote: If this sounds cissexist, it’s because it is.  If there is anyone in the QUILTBAG whose history is more mangled then bisexuals, it’s non-binary people.  I have no idea what non-binary people were doing at this time period or how they fit into this puzzle, and if someone does, please let me know.  I assume lesbians of this time slept with non-binary people because they were also sleeping with men, but I really have no idea how non-binary culture fit into pre-1960’s queer history.  

The word dyke is a lot more ambiguous in it’s origins.  No one is really sure where it came from and speculation runs WILD.  I’ve seen everything from French pirates to Romans fighting Boadicea.  Some say it came from hermaphrodite, a word that in the early 1900’s was used for transgender, intersex, and bisexual people. Yep, you read that right.  Dyke might not have had anything to do with lesbians in it’s original term.  However it was in the dictionary by the 1940’s so again, it came from a time when lesbian and bisexual communities were merged.   And it’s VITAL to note that both dyke and butch were most commonly associated with working-class queer women and queer women of color.  

It was not until the 1960’s that the word lesbian began to imply NOT sleeping with men AT ALL, i.e.being exclusively attracted to women.    The decision to do so (and to treat bisexual women as not-really-queer) was very much tied up in second-wave-feminism.  That history includes gross TERF Shelia Jeffreys’ manifesto which stated bluntly “Our definition of a political lesbian is a woman-identified woman who does not fuck men”.   She made clear in 1979 that bisexuals were no-good gross traitors.   

By the 80’s there was a firm split between lesbians and bisexuals, and lesbians decided to take all the history and act like bisexuals had never been there at all.   It was easy.  Everything already said lesbian on it.  All they had to do was ignore the real history the words in our shared community and not teach it to younger lesbians about them.  Now today bisexuals are constantly excluded from our own history and accused of stealing it by lesbians who frankly don’t know what the hell they are talking about.  Hello bi erasure.  

So any time you see the word lesbian being used or being applied to queer women before the 1960’s, you need to remember that many of those lesbians were what we would now call bisexuals.  

This is why the claim “the terms butch and femme (and dyke) arose from the LESBIAN community for LESBIANS exclusively about the LESBIAN experience” is misleading as hell.  Lesbian communities were shared with bisexuals from the very beginning.   Our history is shared as Same Gender Loving People.  

So it is indeed historically accurate to say, as feminismandflowers did: “bi women have ALWAYS been a part of queer women’s movements and always will be. we have always been a part of forming “lesbian” culture and always will be. and we will always reserve the right to reclaim words like femme, butch, and dyke, because these are also descriptors of our lives and our experiences of queerness.”

- Sarah 

(via cimness)

Source: feminismandflowers
Photo

earthmoonlotus:

fuckyeahrachelsawyer:

madame-ganj:

nezua:

hardcoregurlz:

Slave gravesite in New York City

“SOMETHING YOUR TOUR GUIDE MIGHT NOT TELL YOU: 

The heart of NYC’s Financial District is built on a huge 18th century African Burial Ground. Some 419 Africans were discovered in 1991, a large portion women and children.

The burial ground extends from Broadway Southward under City Hall, and almost to the site of the former World Trade Center. It is believed that there are as many as 20,000 slavery-era Africans in graves under the buildings in Lower Manhattan. 

Abolish historical amnesia and ponder for a moment the fact that this financial epicenter of the world is built on slavery, oppression, and death.”

Literally, and daily.

damn

One of my anthropology professors actually worked at this dig site and told us all about it. Super interesting, and very important. I highly suggest everyone do their research. (Just look here, here, here and here *this one is an article by my professor*)

I’ve reblogged this before, but this version has sources, so…

(via ohthatsloverly)

Source: hardcoregurlz
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allronix:

youturnmetron:

wHY ISN’T THE TRON FANDOM POPULAR?!

WHY?

Long story starting in 1982:

1. Disney REALLY needed a hit to pull them out of the slump they hit in the early 80’s, so there was massive pressure on the movie. 

2. A first-time director/screenwriter who was a computer graphics and programming guy, more a world builder and theoretical computer science guy than storyteller. Let’s face it, the dialogue is cheesy, the plot a bit thin, the characterization isn’t very deep until you hit fanfic, etc.  

3. A cast and crew who had no bleeping idea what they were doing. The only one of the lot with ANY sci-fi/fantasy experience was Warner. Morgan was coming off Caddyshack (from what I could tell, that was an ugly experience with a lot of sexism, cocaine, and blackmail). Bridges had a lot under his belt already, but definitely nothing like this. Boxleitner had acted mostly in Westerns and (at the time) a fun spy dramedy and admits he couldn’t wrap his head around half the stuff he was being sent. (“I’m supposed to be playing a computer program?!”)  

4. Crappy timing. The summer of 1982 was saturated with top-shelf sci-fi, fantasy, and horror. Star Trek II: the Wrath of Kahn blew everyone’s expectations out of the water. ET: The Extraterrestrial, Friday the 13th and Poltergeist (especially ET) ate everything else in the box office for lunch and went back for seconds. 

5. Being 15 years too early. Seriously. Remember, the Net did not exist until the early 90’s or so. Back then, it was ARPANet, and restricted to research labs, universities, and the military. Personal computers could cost as much as a (good-shape) used car and hardly anyone outside schools was going to bother with them.  Video gaming was Atari consoles, or plunking quarters into the Pac-Man machine at the laundromat. 

Video games were not rich virtual worlds like your World of Warcraft MMO. You got some eight-bit creativity that looked like this:

image

This was a screenshot from Tron: Solar Sailer on the Intellivision. Intellivision, at the time, was the best graphics in the business. No shit. So, the idea of virtual worlds populated with AI lifeforms was a big stretch for anyone at the time to picture. Ironically, however, it’s been thought that Tron had a lot to do with why we call people who operate computers “users” (“Operator” and “Computerist” were other terms thrown about at the time) 

Being way, way ahead of its time also bit it in the butt come awards time. These days, even period pieces, Oscar Bait, and romantic comedies use CGI. Special effects? Done with computers. Back in 1982? The Academy Award committee disqualifiedTron from consideration because they “cheated” by using computers! 

6. Because of all the above, the movie made back its money, but was not a hit for Disney. The coin-op arcade game pulled in more cash than the box office. They needed a hit movie and ended up with a smash hit video game, which, at the time, weren’t considered legitimate business, as we were on the cusp of the Crash of 1983 with shovelware proliferating everywhere. This is probably a contributing factor as to why there has been two movies, but anywhere from six to a dozen tie-in games, depending on what you count. It was also a horrible embarrassment for Disney at the time, with the Oscar snub adding insult to injury. 

With all the above, Disney treated the film as an awkward embarrassment and a poorly-thought-out experiment. It was very quickly and quietly put to VHS and left to rot until Pixar admitted it inspired Toy Story and Sony put it on the top of their request list for Kingdom Hearts

(via tronochrome)

Source: youturnmetron
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laineydiemond:

hauntedjaeger:

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

Y’all, Madame Lavoisier commissioned this portrait herself. 
She paid David 7,000 livres.
That’s more than David got for painting the king of France. 
She was one of David’s drawing pupils. 
She recorded her husband’s experiments in drawings, one of which includes her sitting in Lavoisier’s chair in a remarkably similar pose.


i like how this went from some sexist HORSESHIT to a fucking historical lesson of WOMEN KILLIN’ IT FOREVER AND ALWAYS!

laineydiemond:

hauntedjaeger:

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

Y’all, Madame Lavoisier commissioned this portrait herself. 

She paid David 7,000 livres.

That’s more than David got for painting the king of France

She was one of David’s drawing pupils. 

She recorded her husband’s experiments in drawings, one of which includes her sitting in Lavoisier’s chair in a remarkably similar pose.

i like how this went from some sexist HORSESHIT to a fucking historical lesson of WOMEN KILLIN’ IT FOREVER AND ALWAYS!

(via ohthatsloverly)

Source: oxidoreductase
Photo

ryan1320:

Coolest picture ive seen in a while

(via ohthatsloverly)

Source: ryan1320
Quote

"Both [the Federal Transient Program and the Civilian Conservation Corps] were gender-segregated institutions where men worked, ate, recreated, and slept together. But the transient in particular was associated with the distinctive sexual subculture of hoboes and bums in which homosexuality featured prominently. So the FTP was burdened from its inception by the image of the depraved bindle stiff. FTP officials responded by attempting to distinguish the virtue of the Depression-era transient from the hobo of old, suggesting that youthful migrants in particular needed to be protected from sexual advances by the latter type. This discourse of sexual vulnerability, however, did not mitigate but rather attached greater stigma to the program. Moreover, the FTP’s promoters were unable to overcome the moral suspicion aroused by single, able-bodied men on relief. Indeed, while federal aid for unattached men was clearly not the same thing as federal support for homosexuality, what is striking in the FTP records is the discursive linkage between them: critics of the FTP felt that the program not only enabled men to walk out on the dull responsibility of wife and family, but simultaneously established a state-sponsored haven for sex perverts."

-

Margot Canaday, The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America (bolding added)

I’m back to Canaday in my quest to finish some long-overdue books, and my main obstacle to getting through this one is that I find practically every page so interesting that I have to stop and take notes; so expect a resumption of quote-blogging. 

I’ve never read about the specifically queer history of this exact period before (the Great Depression in the US); this linkage in the popular imagination between transience and male homosexuality hadn’t really occurred to me. But now that I think about it, it’s very much of a piece with the pre-WWI US immigration policy, which took as a given that physical weakness or (perceived) gender indeterminacy in men would correspond with both laziness and sexual perversion. Fascinating that those assumptions went on to play such a key role in both the marketing and, later, the failure of the FTP part of the New Deal welfare program, even as the ostensibly more family-centric CCC flourished. 

(via havingbeenbreathedout)

Oh, I adore this. Not least, I must confess, for the phrase “depraved bindle stiff.”

(via professorfangirl)

Source: havingbeenbreathedout
Photo Set

exgynocraticgrrl:

"Brown eyed people are responsible for the fact that you have electricity. Many of the components for generating and transmitting electricity were invented by brown eyed people.

Brown eyed people gave us our alphabet. Brown eyed people gave us our numeration system. Brown eyed people gave us the paper on which we write these anonymous letters to me that tell me that brown eyed people are inferior.

Brown eyed people are the originators, the ones who founded every major religion on Earth. No white people have ever founded a major religion.

Now you need to realize the contributions that have been made to society, to civilization by brown eyed people, by PEOPLE OF COLOR.

I’m talking about people of color here folks. And most of us are not aware of those things because we live in a racist society.

And because we are educated by a racist school system that only teaches us about white contributions.”

- Jane Elliot on the Oprah Winfrey Show panel on racism in 1992.

(via emilianadarling)

Source: exgynocraticgrrl
Photo
howtobeterrell:

anothergirlontheirt:

jadedid:

deejaybird:

Cudjoe Lewis is believed to be the last African born on African soil and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. He was a native of Takon, Benin, where he was captured in 1860 during an illegal slave-trading venture. Congress outlawed the importation of slaves in 1808. Together with more than a hundred other captured Africans, he was brought on the ship Clotilde to Mobile, Alabama. Cudjoe and 31 other enslaved Africans were taken to the property owned by Timothy Meaher, shipbuilder and owner of the Clotilde. 5 years later slavery was over so Cudjoe and his tribespeople requested to be taken back to Africa, but it was left ignored. He and other Africans established a community near Mobile, Alabama which became called Africatown. They maintained their African language and tribal customs well into the 1950s. He died in 1934 at the age of 94. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During her interview in 1928, she made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western Hemisphere of an African transported through the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Between Zora and Du Bois… seriously. They did everything I can only hope to be able to scratch the surface of doing.

Nothing I or you ever do will match this. Effing amazing.

I have this film of him, that Zora recorded

howtobeterrell:

anothergirlontheirt:

jadedid:

deejaybird:

Cudjoe Lewis is believed to be the last African born on African soil and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. He was a native of Takon, Benin, where he was captured in 1860 during an illegal slave-trading venture. Congress outlawed the importation of slaves in 1808. Together with more than a hundred other captured Africans, he was brought on the ship Clotilde to Mobile, Alabama. Cudjoe and 31 other enslaved Africans were taken to the property owned by Timothy Meaher, shipbuilder and owner of the Clotilde. 5 years later slavery was over so Cudjoe and his tribespeople requested to be taken back to Africa, but it was left ignored. He and other Africans established a community near Mobile, Alabama which became called Africatown. They maintained their African language and tribal customs well into the 1950s. He died in 1934 at the age of 94. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During her interview in 1928, she made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western Hemisphere of an African transported through the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Between Zora and Du Bois… seriously. They did everything I can only hope to be able to scratch the surface of doing.

Nothing I or you ever do will match this. Effing amazing.

I have this film of him, that Zora recorded

(via tennyowithaluger)

Source: deejaybird
Photo

nprfreshair:

What happened to works of art under the Nazis is still very much in the news. One piece of that history is the official Nazi response to Modern Art. They called it degenerate, and put on a number of exhibits to demonstrate how terrible it was. A show at New York’s Neue Galerie  is the first major American exhibit since 1991 to deal with this subject. And Fresh Air’s classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz was there to see it:

One of the most unsettling rooms in an important art exhibit at New York’s Neue Galerie is a room in which numerous empty frames are hanging, with guesses about which paintings might have been in them. The paintings themselves were all lost or destroyed by the Nazis. This is part of a show called “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937.” Encouraged by Hitler, most Nazis (Goebbels was the rare exception) considered everything but the most hide-bound, traditionally realistic paintings and sculptures to be “degenerate,” a threat to the Aryan ideals of German culture. To bring this home, there was a series of “exhibitions of shame,” designed to teach the German public to despise Modernist art. This culminated in a major show in Munich in 1937, which later toured Germany and Austria. The public crowded to see it. That same summer in Munich, a counter exhibit, called “The Great German Art Exhibition,” including at least one work owned by Hitler, showed what the Nazis thought art should be. The Neue Galerie includes some 80 works from both of these landmark shows.

Read the full review here. 

Image courtesy of the Neue Galerie 

(via ladysisyphus)

Source: nprfreshair
Photo Set

innerbohemienne:

The Codex Gigas

The Codex Gigas (or ‘Giant Book”) is also known as “The Devil’s Bible.” A curious illustration of Lucifer gives the tome its nickname.

The 13th-century manuscript is thought to have been created solely by a Herman the Recluse, a monk of the Benedictine monastery of Podlažice near Chrudim in Czech Republic. The calligraphy style is amazingly uniform throughout, believed to have taken 25 to 30 years  of work. There are no notable mistakes or omissions.  Pigment analysis revealed the ink to be consistent throughout. The book is enormous - it  measures 36.2” tall, 19.3” wide, and 8.6” thick; it weighs approximately 165 pounds. There are 310 vellum  leaves (620 pages).  The leaves are bound in a wooden folder covered with leather and ornate metal.

The manuscript is elaborately illuminated in red, blue, yellow, green and gold.  The entire document is written in Latin, and also contains Hebrew, Greek, and Slavic Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. The first part of the text includes the Vulgate version of the Bible.  Between the Old and New Testaments are Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews and De bello iudaico, as well as Isidore of Seville's encyclopedia Etymologiae and medical works of Hippocrates, Theophilus, Philaretus, and Constantinus.  Following a blank page, the New Testament commences.

Beginning the second part is a depiction of the devil.  Directly opposite is a full picture of the kingdom of heaven, juxtaposing the “good versus evil.”  The second half, following the picture of the devil, is Cosmas of Prague's Chronicle of Bohemia.  A list of brothers in the Podlažice monastery and a calendar with necrologium, magic formulae and other local records round out the codex.  Record entries end in the year 1229CE.

In 1648 at the end of the Thirty Years’ War, the Swedish army invaded Prague and the Codex was stolen as plunder.  It is now held at the National Library of Sweden in Stockholm.  For more information, check out this short National Geographic documentary and/or flip through this digital copy.

( Wikipedia entry, et. al)

Several short National Geographic videos ~

One Helluva Book

Who Wrote The Devil’s Bible?

Super-human Scribe

The Devil’s Bible - Part 1.flv  (9:59) (derived from full video bleow)

The Devil’s Bible - Part 2.flv  (9:59) (derived from full video below)

** If you have the least amount of intellectual curiosity or interest in history, the short vids above will only whet your appetite: might as well grab a cold drink & some popcorn, then settle in to watch the whole thing ~

NatGeo : The Devil’s Bible - Full video  (44:58)

(via whatistigerbalm)

Source: bhilluminated.wordpress.com