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Posts Tagged: Gender Issues

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perpugilliam:

lizawithazed:

mechabre:

this is so incredibly important to me holy shit

an article about an agender person’s identity ON THE FRONT PAGE OF THE WASHINGTON POST

FRONT AND CENTER!!!!!

IM JUST

AGHAFDHF!! SJFGSJS!! JSHFKA!! HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME

this kind of visibility is excellent, but I’m curbing my enthusiasm until I can read the article. :/

Read here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/when-no-gender-fits-a-quest-to-be-seen-as-just-a-person/2014/09/20/1ab21e6e-2c7b-11e4-994d-202962a9150c_story.html :)

(via marchek)

Source: mechabre
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aconnormanning:

maneth985:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.



This post was good but then it got better

aconnormanning:

maneth985:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

This post was good but then it got better

(via shirozora-lives)

Source: dajo42
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the-real-seebs:

I occasionally try to think of ways to convince people that misogyny is an actual cultural thing without having to argue about statistics and sources.

And I think I found it:

"Bitch" is an insult to a guy because it implies that he takes shit from people, and to a girl because it implies that she doesn’t.

(via theteratophile)

Source: the-real-seebs
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blue-author:

charity-knows-best:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

stfueverything:

pixiepienix:

look at this fragile delicate flower of a man look at how precarious his value and identity is wonder at the marvel that is masculinity

This makes me want to cry blood.

This is a prime example of patriarchy at work. He can’t handle holding a fucking purse for 2 fucking seconds before he has to bust out his “man bag” so he can feel validated by his male peers who are rooting him on for not wanting to be feminine. Is his ego and sense of masculinity so fragile he can’t possibly brush it with the slightest amount of femininity before he crashes and burns??

Not to mention the fact that a symbol of feminity is being equated to a literal piece of shit.

or maybe he just doesn’t want to hold a fucking purse? god fucking damn it.

You’re right. We shouldn’t for anything in the world ever think about why he wouldn’t want to hold a purse, why he would feel it’s reasonable to drop it like it’s radioactive and then treat it both like toxic waste and a shameful secret, or why an audience of men would applaud him for treating it in this way instead of just holding the thing his wife asked him to hold.

Masculinity is too fragile to withstand investigation. We must protect it at all costs.

(via theteratophile)

Source: gifak-net
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scrawls:

thewriterchick:

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  

And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 

Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.

I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”

I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.

Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.


(My Son Wears Dresses And That’s OK With Me | Seth Menachem for xoJane)


Can I just say the fact that the little girl’s first reaction was “I’ll tell them to go away” made me tear up?That’s a kid, at such a young age, willing to defend people. That’s a kid who, if her brother wears a dress to school and gets picked on, will run to his side in a minute, regardless of what her friends will say. Oh god the feelings. I can’t handle it.

Family of the year right there :)

scrawls:

thewriterchick:

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  
And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 
Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.
I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”
I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.
Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.

Can I just say the fact that the little girl’s first reaction was “I’ll tell them to go away” made me tear up?

That’s a kid, at such a young age, willing to defend people. That’s a kid who, if her brother wears a dress to school and gets picked on, will run to his side in a minute, regardless of what her friends will say.

Oh god the feelings. I can’t handle it.

Family of the year right there :)

(via dsudis)

Source: gaywrites
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Thoughts on Streetcar Named Desire

professorfangirl:

havingbeenbreathedout:

GOD, y’all, so I just got back from the National Theatre Live production of Streetcar Named Desire and I am just. Overflowing with thoughts and feelings about it. Tennessee Williams is one of my dad’s favorite playwrights, so I grew up watching the John Huston Night…

"…in a Williams play, disgust for the human, and the failure of compassion, are the ugliest things one can feel." That is so spot-on it kind of choked me up.

Source: havingbeenbreathedout
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"Oftentimes when I am in a place occupied by butches and men, masculinity becomes a kind of currency. Butches start talking about how they’ve “fucked more girls” than the men, “gotten more pussy,” and are “better in bed.” Their sexual partners become objects rather than humans.

If there are women in the room, their objectification seems to be a bonding mechanism for the butches and men, laughing about who has the best ass, the best tits, who they’d fuck or not fuck. I can show a picture of my girlfriend to a man and know I will get instant respect from him based on her attractiveness. I know that because I’ve done it in the past, and that respect felt good to me, like my masculinity was confirmed by “the source.”

And that, my friends, is unbelievably fucked up."

Source: everydayfeminism.com
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catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.

(via damnhistrionics)

Source: catherineaddington
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Science’s Sexual Assault Problem

professorfangirl:

"There is a fundamental and culturally learned power imbalance between men and women, and it follows us into the workplace. The violence born of this imbalance follows us also. We would like to believe that it stops short of following us into the laboratory and into the field — but it does not. I listen to my colleagues talk endlessly about recruiting more women into STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, and postulate what the barriers might be. Sexual assault is a pernicious and formidable barrier to women in science, partly because we have consistently gifted to it our silence. I have given it 18 years of my silence and I will not give it one day more."

Source: professorfangirl
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doctorscienceknowsfandom:

rainewynd:

em-kellesvig:

thesmilingfish:

em-kellesvig:

thesmilingfish:

dorothyoz39:

thesmilingfish:

thesmilingfish:

Quite possibly the most unfriendly looking behind the scenes picture ever. 

I can’t find the link, but I remember reading something about Joe arguing with Mallozzi about Sheppard not knowing there was an all female SG team under his command was disrespectful to his character and that Sheppard would know who were on what teams and that it was a hit to his character all for a stupid joke. Turns out Joe F. was right because the ‘joke’ fell flat and left fans perplexed at Sheppard lack of knowledge.

I could be misremembering though, so hello world at large please feel free to correct me.

I remember reading exactly the same thing!

Reading about Atlantis is a constant reminder of how much Mallozzi and Co screwed up by ignoring Joe. This is just one example, killing Weir is probably the biggest of them…

Joe fought them over the killing off Elizabeth and Carson as well. Joe has said at conventions this was about the time that they stopped telling him things - and so probably it’s close to the end of them stopping listening to him as well. It’s frustrating because at that point Joe was a lot more invested in the show than the actual show runners who were already planning out SGU. 

Another problem Flanigan had with Mallozzi around this time was the issue of behind the scenes photographs. As you can see with this one, it has the MGM watermark. The actors’ contracts clearly stated that only MGM and SciFi had permission to take BTS photos and use them for promo purposes. 

Mallozzi, however, had started taking photos of his own of the cast and crew and was posting them on his personal blog without their permission, without recompense, for his own benefit and profit, and in direct violation of the actors’ contracts.

Naturally, the cast and crew were upset about Mallozzi using these photos to drive traffic to his personal blog but no one really wanted to call him on it given that Mallozzi and Paul Mullie were co-executive producers and had been since Season 2 (during Season 1, they were consulting producers with Michael Greenburg and N. John Smith as Executive producers). 

So cast and crew quietly asked Flanigan to speak to Mallozzi on their behalf. Whether they asked him because he was the union shop foreman, or the show’s star, or they thought he’d be the most persuasive is open to conjecture. They asked and Flanigan spoke to Mallozzi, who didn’t take it well at all.

He did stop taking photos on set without permission — he certainly never took another photo of Joe Flanigan — but when he did, and when he posted said photos to his blog, he made a point of saying (with truculent asides) that he had permission from the actors, that he wasn’t trying to profit from them, and (I’m paraphrasing here) wasn’t it sad that some people had to spoil the fun for everyone.

It was all downhill for Flanigan and Sheppard from there.

Yes, TPTB stopped listening to Flanigan, and Sheppard was not only disrespected as a character but virtually pushed aside throughout Season 5. Not just because of Universe but because Mallozzi held a grudge. It’s all there on his blog. I read it in real time and was appalled by Mallozzi’s childish behavior. 

Mallozzi violated the actors’ contracts, got called on it, and took it out on the one person who said something to him, even though Flanigan was speaking for them all. Sad.

Well, damn. I’d forgotten about that. Does it make me a bad person that I am gleeful that Mallozzi and co. have, for the most part, found zero work in the entertainment industry since SGU went off the air?

This just adds to the pissoffedness I had when I found out that Joe F. had a group of investors and was trying to negotiate with MGM to do SGA. From what I’ve pieced together it was probably around the same time that Devilin and Emmerich were in meetings for their own Stargate movie reboot - and MGM decided to go with two failed producers. (Seriously, they have more misses than hits in their catalog.) 

So now we’re sitting here with a dilemma. The reboot we never wanted. The reboot we were hoping for - with someone besides the old PTB at the helm. If the movie does badly does that put a kibosh on any more Stargate for the foreseeable future? If the movie does well does that mean we’ll just get more of the movies that completely ignore 17 years worth of television canon?

Someone smarter than me, which is pretty much anyone reading this, needs to explain to me what the best course of action is for fandom in general with this. Petitions aren’t going to do shit - I know that much. We’re pretty much guaranteed that MGM didn’t give the exclusive rights to the franchise to D&E - this is one of their biggest franchises and they’re going to hold on to it tightly. But what can we do to show MGM what we really want? It needs to be a concentrated effort and not spread out to include SG-1 and SGU because that’s just too much to ask for off the bat I would think. Specifics would be best I would imagine. But at the end of the day from MGM’s POV it’s all about the bottom line. Will it make money? That’s all they really care about. How do we go about, as a fandom, engaging the studio and revitalizing the fandom?

Wow. This reblogging of a picture because I was having private conversations with someone about “Whispers” really took off in a heavy yet delightfully unexpected way. 

The thing is: it doesn’t matter if an SGA reboots makes money. MGM believes it won’t. Wright and Cooper had no faith in it. Mallozzi and Pullie had no faith in it. They had no faith in the fans. 

"This is not the demographic we’re looking for." — Brad Wright, as he canceled SGA to make way for SGU.

They wanted the male 18-25 demo, the emo boy gamers in Mom’s basement. What they didn’t realize, what they still don’t realize, is that Mom’s the old school sci fi reader. Mom writes the fanfic. Mom has the money.

But they don’t know how to write to our demographic. They never did. They tried to put Amanda Tapping in a push-up bra and a tank top and she refused, thank whatever gods you chose. Because that’s how they write women: for men. For adolescent men. Not for women or people of color. 

So, no, they won’t listen to us. That’s why the petitions didn’t work. That’s why email campaigns won’t work. We’re not the demographic they want, even though we’re the demographic with the money to spend, with the ability to invest, and the interest to do so. Nearly two decades of time, energy, and money later, and they still don’t get that their fan base is mostly women, 25 and up. 

If they aren’t willing to hire female writers, listen to professional women storytellers, why the hell would they listen to us?

Which is just…ignoring the fact that the best shows, period, appeal to everyone. What makes Star Trek enduring, to me, is that it made you feel like you could dream to be any of the crew (and I’m not counting the reboot here). When SGA killed off Weir, they killed off a lot of my interest in the show because it said they didn’t want that character at all or anyone like her.

They don’t want us, because most of that stuff about being motivated by the bottom line and profits is just a cover story. What they really want is to do something that impresses their friends — and by “friends” I mean “powerful white men they *wish* were their friends”. It’s all, *all* about performing masculinity — and because our culture has a subtractive definition of masculinity, any interest by women automatically makes a thing (activity, art, posture, emotion, whatever) less masculine. So it’s *really important* to not just appeal to young men, but to drive away women, especially older women.

I have also heard it said that the reason the advertising industry focuses so relentlessly on males, especially younger males, is that they are suckers. They are more influenced by brands and ads than women are, and more likely to impulse buy.

Women are taught to shop — by our mothers, peers, and culture. It’s a skill we’re expected to practice and hone, to become canny consumers in a consumer culture. Because shopping skills are gendered feminine, being brand-loyal and impulsive becomes gendered masculine, which makes men even more prone to be suckers as consumers. And that means ads aimed at men are more likely to pay off.

(via cimness)

Source: thesmilingfish
Link

Report: 38 men are sexually assaulted each day in the US military – wrong to assume perpetrators are gay

lgbtqblogs:

Figures show 38 men are sexually assaulted every single day in the US military – and it’s a myth to assume most of the perpetrators are gay – a leading clinician says.

James Asbrand, a psychologist with the Salt Lake City Veteran Affairs post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clinical team, is seeking to challenge the false notion that sexual orientation lies behind the prevalence of male sexual assaults in the US military.

Mr Asbrand told GQ: “One of the myths is that the perpetrators identify as gay, which is by and large not the case. It’s not about the sex. It’s about power and control.

“In a hypermasculine culture, what’s the worst thing you can do to another man? Force him into what the culture perceives as a feminine role.”

An estimated 14,000 military men were assaulted in 2012, according to GQ.

Most of the victims refused to inform their superiors, many fearing repercussions detrimental to their career.

Dana Chipman, who served as a judge advocate general for the US Army from 2009 to 2013, said: “The way we socialise people probably has some effect on the incidents.

“We cut your hair, and we give you the same clothes, and we tell you that you have no more privacy, you have no more individual rights—we’re gonna take you down to your bare essence and then rebuild you in our image.”

Research reveals that military sexual trauma (MST) victims are often falsely diagnosed with personality disorders so that they can be discharged without the federal government bearing the cost of aftercare required in treating post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD).

Mental health is a huge issue for the military.

An estimated 31,000 military personnel were involuntarily discharged for personality disorders between 2001 and 2010.

Although the US military lifted Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, a ban which prevented gay and lesbian people from serving openly in the military in 2011, many gay service personnel feel unable to be open about their sexual orientation.

Charles Bigo, a victim of sexual abuse who served in the US Army from 1966-1969, spoke of how he experienced a sense of self-blame.

“I’ve told my psychologist, ‘Maybe it’s my fault, because I’m gay.’ I was looking for friendship, companionship, some kind of emotional connection with somebody. They were predators. They knew what they saw in me that allowed them to be that way.”

He continued: “I’m terrified of men. I’m gay and I’m terrified of men. I can’t even get an erection, especially since I got sober. I isolate. I don’t go to movies, I can’t handle concerts. I have horrid nightmares.

“Last Christmas, I went to dinner with some friends, and at one point I started panicking so bad I had to get out of the restaurant. I was shaking. I never even told anybody about this until last July. Do you know what it’s like to live with this for thirty years?”

(via zooeyscigar)

Source: lgbtqblogs
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dontbearuiner:

abbyjean:

Charts from OKCupid, showing how straight women and men rate each other based on ages. For women, the men they find most attractive are roughly their own age. For men, the women they find most attractive are roughly the same age - 20 to 23 - regardless of the age of the man. (538)

Fucking gross.

I mean, I dated a guy much older than myself in my early-20s, but it was neither of our MOs to date with that age discrepancy. We met through friends and had shit in common.

Source: abbyjean
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This [casual sexism] is a systemic problem – it starts somewhere with little girls needing to be rescued by knights, incapable of being independent. In playgrounds and kids’ parties I often hear: ‘Wow, look at her, she’s a supermodel!’ or ‘This is daddy’s princess’ or ‘You don’t need to learn another language when you look like that!’ Or, even more common: ‘You’re gonna need to lock that one up when she becomes a teenager.’ I haven’t heard much of ‘Wow, watch out you’ve got yourself a JK Rowling there; oops, here comes another Angela Merkel, Hillary Clinton, Caitlin Moran, Paula Radcliffe, or Hilary Mantel!”’ - Natascha McElhone 

(via theteratophile)

Source: mulders
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exitpursuedbyasloth:

kittydoom:

salon:

We dare you to say we don’t live in a rape culture.

Amazingly, not The Onion:

“[W]e now have young men telling Bloomberg News that they basically view their female peers as rape bombs just waiting to explode and ruin their lives.”

“Some men feel that too much responsibility for preventing sexual assault has been put on their shoulders,” according to one of the men interviewed for the piece.

Yes, how dare we put the responsibility for rape on the shoulders of the rapists and potential rapists. How dare we.

(via saltysalmonella)

Source: salon